SOLYP-Blog

In management theory, the intelligence of the many is portrayed as superior to that of a homogeneous group such as a board of directors. Nonetheless, so-called swarm intelligence is a phenomenon that occurs by chance and is therefore hardly capable of controlling strategic processes for a company...

Insights into concrete strategic processes, a lively exchange of ideas and an inspirational atmosphere – with virtues like these, the third Best Practice Meeting was a convincing success. Around 20 people responsible for strategy, and who came from the widest variety of industries, met at the Villa Kennedy in Frankfurt. Thomas Herrlinger, head of strategic business development and investor relations at Schuler AG, was the guest speaker. He presented this traditional machine maker’s strategy process and invited colleagues to join in discussion.

As I recently took a close look at the visitor statistics for our strategy blog, I found myself rubbing my eyes in amazement: Nearly 40% of all visitors had clicked on the entry about John Kotter’s 8-step model! Despite the fact that, over the past few months, we have presented and discussed strategy models that would appear at first glance to be more modern ...

One of the central questions which first need to be clarified as part of the introduction or revision of a strategic planning process in medium and large enterprises is the direction of planning. Basically, three alternative planning directions can be distinguished: top-down planning, bottom-up planning and planning using a counter-flow process. Which of these is best for a company depends primarily on the respective corporate culture. Relevant questions are whether the company is mainly centrally or decentrally organised, how much value is attached to staff participation and whether open communication and an ongoing exchange of information is practiced....

Companies usually possess various kinds of resources and capabilities—financial, human, organizational, physical, and technological. For strategists, this raises the question as to which ones are so-called core competencies providing a source of sustainable competitive advantage. A good way to find out is the VRIO analysis which was first developed in 1991 by Jay B. Barney, the founder of the resource-based view, and since then repeatedly refined.